I had a black dog, his name was depression


“I had a black dog, his name was depression” is a short, gentle, and honest animated video about the experience of depression and the need to get help.

In the video, a big black dog represents depression. The video shows how the dog affects the narrator’s life. It will take less than 5 minutes to watch this well-made story, brought to us by the World Health Organization. If you enjoy it, please share it so others can see it too.

Day For Night: Recognizing Teenage Depression Video


This 5 minute video shows teenagers discussing their symptoms in their own words. It’s worth watching no matter what age you are. What resonates with you?

 

Dealing Effectively with Depression and Bipolar Disorder 


This article provides information from the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA) on the symptoms of depression and bipolar disorder and how to treat and manage them. It provides a guide for taking control of your own mental health journey.

Here are the key recovery concepts that the article presents:

Key Recovery Concepts

Six key concepts provide the foundation of effective recovery work. They are:

  • Hope. With good symptom management, it is possible to experience long periods of wellness. Believing that you can cope with your mood disorder is both accurate and essential to recovery.
  • Perspective. Depression and Bipolar Disorder often follow cyclical patterns. Although you may go through some painful times and it may be difficult to believe things will get better, it is important not to give up hope.
  • Personal Responsibility. It’s up to you to take action to keep your moods stabilized. This includes asking for help from others when you need it, taking your medication as prescribed and keeping appointments with your health care providers.
  • Self Advocacy. Become an effective advocate for yourself so you can get the services and treatment you need, and make the life you want for yourself.
  • Education. Learn all you can about your illness. This allows you to make informed decisions about all aspects of your life and treatment.
  • Support. Working toward wellness is up to you. However, support from others is essential to maintaining your stability and enhancing the quality of your life.

 

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